Chapter 5: Using Social Media: One Physical Education Teacher’s Experience

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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  • 1 University of West Georgia
  • 2 University of Northern Colorado
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Purpose: This study explored one physical education teacher’s engagement in an online professional learning community and her perceptions of its impact on her own feelings of isolation. Sense of community theory was used as a lens to explore the data. Method: Using a single instrumental case study design, the participant of this study was a female physical education teacher. The data were collected through semistructured interviews, public tweets (Twitter), and informal participant communication (Voxer). The data were analyzed using categorical aggregation, and codes with similar meanings were combined to develop themes. Results: Three themes were evident across data sources that represented her perceptions of participation in an online professional learning community: (a) taking initiative, (b) different support systems, and (c) stages of social media participation. Conclusion: Social media can provide a sense of community for physical education teachers, allowing them to feel less isolated.

Brooks is with the University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA, USA. McMullen is with University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO, USA.

Brooks (cbrooks@westga.edu) is corresponding author.
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