Chapter 6: Preservice Teachers’ Perceptions of Twitter for Health and Physical Education Teacher Education: A Self-Determination Theoretical Approach

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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  • 1 Charles Sturt University
  • 2 Ohio University
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Purpose: Limited research has been conducted relating to the use of social media during health and physical education teacher education. The aim of this study was to investigate preservice teachers’ perceptions of the value of using Twitter for health and physical education teacher education. Methods: Preservice teachers completed a qualitatively designed survey. Thematic analyses were conducted via Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software, aligned to self-determination theory. Results: Twitter was perceived to be valuable for the following motivational components: (a) autonomy (choice over professional development, latest ideas, and learning flexibility), (b) relatedness (enhancing communication, tailored collaborations, and receiving practical support), and (c) competence (transferring ideas to classes, increasing technological competence, and keeping ahead of other teachers). Yet there were concerns due to Twitter’s public exposure to undesired Twitter users (relatedness) and how to navigate the platform (competence). Discussion/Conclusions: The study provides guidance to health and physical education teacher education providers on how digital learning via Twitter can meet preservice teachers’ learning needs.

Hyndman is with Charles Sturt University, Albury-Wodonga, New South Wales, Australia. Harvey is with Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA.

Hyndman (bhyndman@csu.edu.au) is corresponding author.
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