Peer-to-Peer Learning: The Impact of Order of Performance on Learning Fundamental Movement Skills Through Video Analysis With Middle School Children

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education

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Anna ThackerFaculty of Kinesiology, The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

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Jennifer HoFaculty of Kinesiology, The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

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Arsalan KhawajaFaculty of Kinesiology, The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

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Larry KatzFaculty of Kinesiology, The University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

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Purpose: Through video analysis, this paper explores the impact that order of performance has on middle school students’ performance of fundamental movement skills within a peer-to-peer learning model. Order of performance refers to the order in which a student performed a skill while paired up with a peer. Method: Using a mobile application, Move Improve®, 18 students (eight males and 10 females) completed a standing jump and hollow body roll in partners assigned to order of performance (evaluator/performer). An independent samples t test was conducted to evaluate the differences in the mean scores between students who performed first and those who performed second for each skill. Results: There was a significant difference in standing jump scores (p < .01), where students who performed second had a higher average score than their peers who went first. Although not statistically significant (p = .293), results for hollow body roll also showed a similar performance pattern for students who went second compared with those who performed first. Conclusion: The order of performance within a peer-to-peer learning model may have a significant effect on performance scores for standing jump but not for hollow body roll. Reasons for the discrepancy may be due to a combination of skill familiarity, skill complexity, and training of observational learning.

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