Wearable Digital Technology in PE: Advantages, Barriers, and Teachers’ Ideologies

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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Purpose: To explore teachers’ perceptions of incorporating digital technologies in physical education (PE) and how they influenced pedagogical practices. Method: Data were collected using qualitative methods (interviews, observations, and artifacts) and were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results: Teachers integrated wearable digital technologies in ways they thought would augment their PE programs, not replace them. It also was found that teachers’ ideologies of PE shaped the way they implemented wearable digital technologies. Finally, the material circumstances of schools affected the ways in which wearable digital technologies could be implemented in PE. Conclusion: Teachers were willing to integrate wearable digital technologies if they augmented (and did not replace) their preferred purpose of PE. Given this, ideologies of teachers influenced the role that technologies played in teaching and learning in PE.

Marttinen is with George Mason University, Manassas, VA. Landi is with Towson University, Towson, MD. Fredrick is with Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing, NY. Silverman is with the Department of Biobehavioral Sciences, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY.

Marttinen (rmarttin@gmu.edu) is the corresponding author.
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