The Impact of Participation in an Outdoor Education Program on Physical Education Teacher Education Student Self-Efficacy to Teach Outdoor Education

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $63.00

1 year subscription

USD $84.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $119.00

2 year subscription

USD $156.00

Purpose: Self-efficacy, having been identified as a factor influencing teacher effectiveness, combined with the increased prevalence of outdoor education (OE) content being taught within physical education contexts, warrants the need for physical education teacher education (PETE) programs to address OE outcomes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if participation in an OE program increased self-efficacy to teach OE among PETE students. Methods: PETE students (N = 95) were taught OE content in multiple residential environments and were evaluated using the “Survey of Self-efficacy for Teaching Outdoor Education.” Results: Results indicated a significant increase in self-efficacy scores from pretest to posttest in all content areas (OE skills, group dynamic skills, and models and theories). Overall, the OE program had a large effect in changing self-efficacy scores. Conclusion: Participation in the program positively affected PETE students’ self-efficacy for teaching OE, which may improve their ability to ultimately teach this content in physical education settings.

Hovey, Niland, and Foley are with the Physical Education Department, State University of New York at Cortland, Cortland, NY.

Hovey (Katherine.hovey@cortland.edu) is corresponding author.
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
Article Sections
References
  • AndersonR.GreeneM. & LoewenP. (1988). Relationships among teachers’ and students’ thinking skills, sense of efficacy, and student achievement. Alberta Journal of Educational Research 34 148165.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • AydenizM. & OzdilekZ. (2014). Assessing and enhancing pre-service science teachers’ self-efficacy to teach science through argumentation: Challenges and possible solutions. International Journal of Science and Math Education 14 12551273 . doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • BanduraA. (1977). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. Psychological Review 84 191215. PubMed ID: 847061. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • BanduraA. (1986). The explanatory and predictive scope of self-efficacy theory. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology 4 359373. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • BanduraA. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York, NY: W.H. Freeman and Company.

  • BortonT. (1970). Reach touch and teach. London, UK: Hutchinson.

  • CainK. & McAvoyL. (1990). Experience‐based judgment. In J. Miles & S. Priest (Eds.) Adventure education (pp. 241250). State College, PA: Venture Publishing.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • CohenJ. (1992). Quantitative methods in psychology: A power primer. Psychological Bulletin 112 155159. PubMed ID: 19565683 doi:

  • CsikszentmihalyiM. (1975). Beyond boredom and anxiety. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

  • DellingerA.B.BobbettJ.J.OlivierD.F. & EllettC.D. (2008). Measuring teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs: Development and use of the TEBS-Self. Teaching and Teacher Education 24 751766. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DillonM.TennehillD. & O’sullivanM. (2017). “I know when I did it, I got frustrated”: The influence of “living” a curriculum for preservice teachers. Journal of Teaching Physical Education 36 445454. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DunnJ.G.H.BouffardM. & RogersW.T. (1999). Assessing item content-relevance in sport psychology scale-construction research: Issues and recommendations. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 3 1536. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • FahlmanM.M.HallH.L. & GutuskeyL. (2013). The impact of a health methods class on pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy and intent to teach health. American Journal of Health Education 44 316323. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • FeltzD.L. & WeissM.R. (1982). Developing self-efficacy through sport. Journal of Physical Education Recreation & Dance 53 2436. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • FieldA. (2009). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS statistics (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

  • GibbsG. (1988). Learning by doing: A guide to teaching and learning methods. Oxford, UK: Further Education Unit, Oxford Polytechnic.

  • GibsonS. & DemboM.H. (1984). Teacher efficacy: A construct validation. Journal of Educational Psychology 76 569582. doi:

  • GreenP. (1990). Outdoor leadership preparation. In J. Miles & S. Priest (Eds.) Adventure education (pp. 217220). State College, PA: Venture Publishing.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • HensonR.K. (2002). From adolescent angst to adulthood: Substantive implications and measurement dilemmas in the development of teacher efficacy research. Educational Psychologist 37 137150. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • HorwoodB. (1999). Educational adventure and schooling. In J. Miles & S. Priest (Eds.) Adventure programming (pp. 912). State College, PA : Venture Publishing.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • HousegoB. (1992). Monitoring student teachers’ feeling of preparedness to teach, personal teaching efficacy, and teaching efficacy in a new secondary teacher education program. Alberta Journal of Educational Research 38 4964.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • HoyW.K. & WoolfolkA.E. (1990). Socialization of student teachers. American Educational Research Journal 27 279300. doi:

  • LoremanT.SharmaU. & ForlinC. (2013). Do pre-service teachers feel ready to teach in inclusive classrooms? A four country study of teaching self-efficacy. Australian Journal of Teacher Education 38 2744. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • McGowanM.L. (1986). Self efficacy: Operationalizing challenge education. Bradford Papers Annual 1 6569.

  • MoseleyC.ReinkeK. & BookoutV. (2002). The effect of teaching outdoor environmental education on preservice teachers’ attitudes toward self-efficacy and outcome expectancy. Journal of Environmental Education 34 915. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • NorthC. (2015). Rain and romanticism: The environment in outdoor education. Asia-Pacific Journal of Health Sport and Physical Education 6 287298. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • PriestS. & GassM.A. (2005). Effective leadership in adventure programming. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

  • PropstD.B. & KoeslerR.A. (1998). Bandura goes outdoors: Role of self-efficacy in the outdoor leadership development process. Leisure Sciences 20 319344. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • RolfeG.FreshwaterD. & JasperM. (2001). Critical reflection for nursing and the helping professions: A user’s guide. Basingstoke, England: Palgrave.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • RotterJ.B. (1966). Generalized expectancies for internal versus external control of reinforcement. Psychological Monographs 80 128. PubMed ID: 5340840. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SHAPE America. (2014). National standards & grade-level outcomes for K-12 physical education. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

  • SharmaU. & GeorgeS. (2016). Understanding teacher self-efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. In S. Garvis & D. Pendergast (Eds.) Asia-pacific perspectives on teacher self-efficacy (pp. 3751). Boston, MA: Sense Publishers.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SiwatuK.O. (2011). Preservice teachers’ sense of preparedness and self-efficacy to teach America’s urban and suburban schools: Does context matter? Teaching and Teacher Education 27 357365. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SkaalvikE.M. & SkaalvikS. (2007). Dimensions of teacher self-efficacy and relations with strain factors, perceived collective teacher efficacy, and teacher burnout. Journal of Educational Psychology 99 611625. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SutherlandS. & LeggeM. (2016). The possibilities of “doing” outdoor and/or adventure education in physical education/teacher education. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education 35 299312. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SutherlandS. & StuhrP.T. (2014). Reactions to implementing adventure-based learning in physical education. Sport Education and Society 19 489506. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • TimkenG. & McNameeJ. (2012). New perspectives for teaching physical education: Preservice teachers’ reflections on outdoor and adventure education. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education 31 2138. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Tschannen-MoranM.Woolfolk HoyA. & HoyW.K. (1998). Teacher efficacy: Its meaning and measure. Review of Educational Research 68 202248. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • TuckmanB.W. & JensenM.A. (1977). Stages of small group development revisited. Group and Organization Studies 2 419427. doi:

  • WalshV. & GolinsG. (1976). The exploration of the Outward Bound process. Denver, CO: Colorado Outward Bound School.

Article Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 82 82 20
Full Text Views 9 9 4
PDF Downloads 5 5 1
Altmetric Badge
PubMed
Google Scholar