Stakeholders’ Perspectives on the Effects of a PEP Grant on a District-Wide CSPAP

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD  $63.00

1 year subscription

USD  $84.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD  $119.00

2 year subscription

USD  $156.00

A Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) can help children be physically active for 60 min/day. Physical Education for Progress grants provided opportunities to improve physical education and physical activity programming. Purpose: This study explored stakeholders’ perspectives on the effects of a Physical Education for Progress grant on a district-wide CSPAP. Method: Stakeholders included physical educators (n = 10; K–12), administrators (n = 6), and one superintendent. Individual, semistructured interviews were used to examine how the grant affected stakeholders’ perspectives of the CSPAP. Results: The grant affected the CSPAP by providing (a) opportunities for professional development, (b) opportunities to establish a K–12 curriculum map, and (c) access to equipment and resources. Discussion: Framed in social ecological theory, intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and community levels were influenced by the grant. Interactions between levels enabled changes in all CSPAP components, especially quality PE. Conclusion: A Physical Education for Progress grant is a successful mechanism to enhance a district-wide CSPAP.

Abel-Berei is with the Department of Health and Movement Sciences, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT, USA. Goc Karp, Fennell, Drake, and Olsen are with the University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, USA.

Abel-Berei (bereic1@southernct.edu) is corresponding author.
  • Carson, R.L., Abel-Berei, C.P., Russ, L., Shawley, J., Peal, T., & Weinberger, C. (2020). Chapter 3: Internal capacity building: The role of the CSPAP champion and other school professionals. In R.L. Carson& C.A. Webster (Eds.), Comprehensive school physical activity programs: Putting research into evidence-based practice (pp. 35–52). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Carson, R.L., Castelli, D.M., Beighle, A., & Erwin, H. (2014). School-based physical activity promotion: A conceptual framework for research and practice. Childhood Obesity, 10, 100–106. PubMed ID: 24655311 doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Carson, R.L., Pulling, A.C., Castelli, D.M., & Beighle, A. (2014). Facilitators and inhibitors of the DPA program and CSPAP implementation. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 85(Suppl. 1), A-56.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Castelli, D.M., Carson, R.L., & Kulinna, P.H. (2017). PETE programs creating teacher leaders to integrate comprehensive school physical activity programs. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation, & Dance, 88(1), 8–10. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Centeio, E., Erwin, H., & Castelli, D.M. (2014). Comprehensive school physical activity programs: Characteristics of trained teachers. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 33, 492–510. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Centeio, E.E., McCaughtry, N., Gutuskey, L., Garn, A.C., Somers, C., Shen, B., . . . Kulik, N.L. (2014). Physical activity change through comprehensive school physical activity programs in urban elementary schools. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 33, 573–591. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2013). Comprehensive school physical activity programs: A guide for schools. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/physicalactivity/pdf/13_242620-A_CSPAP_SchoolPhysActivityPrograms_Final_508_12192013.pdf

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017). 2017 High school youth risk behavior surveillance system. Atlanta, CA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/results.htm

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chen, W., Hypnar, A.J., Mason, S.A., Zalmout, S., & Hammond-Benett, A. (2014). Students’ daily physical activity behaviors: The role of quality physical education in a comprehensive school physical activity program. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 33, 592–610. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative. (2016). 2016 National survey of children’s health. Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health. Retrieved from https://www.childhealthdata.org/browse/survey/results?q=4578&r=1

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cipriani, K., Richardson, C., & Roberts, G. (2012). Family and community involvement in the comprehensive school physical activity program. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 83(7), 20–26. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Creswell, J.W. (2012). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches (3rd ed.). London, UK: Sage.

  • Deslatte, K., & Carson, R.L. (2014). Identifying the common characteristics of comprehensive school physical activity programs in Louisiana. The Physical Educator, 71, 610–634.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dwyer, J.J., Allison, K.R., Barrera, M., Hansen, B., Goldenberg, E., & Boutilier, M.A. (2003). Teacher’s perspective on barriers to implementing physical activity curriculum guidelines for school children in Toronto. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 94, 448–452. PubMed ID: 14700245 doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Elliott, S., McCollum, S., Colquitt, G., & Pritchard, T. (2013). Perceptions of the impact of a PEP grant on elementary physical education programs in one school district. The Physical Educator, 70, 429–446.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Goc Karp, G., Scruggs, P.W., Brown, H., & Kelder, S.H. (2014). Implications for comprehensive school physical activity program implementation. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 33, 611–623. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Goh, T.L., Hannon, J., Webster, C.A., Podlog, L.W., Brusseau, T., & Newton, M. (2014). Effects of a classroom-based physical activity program on children’s physical activity levels. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 33, 558–572. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Jones, E.M., Taliaferro, A.R., Elliott, E.M., Bulger, S.M., Kristjansson, A.L., Neal, W., & Allar, I. (2014). Feasibility study of comprehensive school physical activity programs in Appalachian communities: The McDowell CHOICES project. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 33, 467–491. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kulinna, P.H., Brusseau, T., Cothran, D., & Tudor-Locke, C. (2012). Changing school physical activity: An examination of individual school designed programs. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 31, 113–130. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Langille, J.D., & Rodgers, W.M. (2010). Exploring the influence of a social ecological model on school-based physical activity. Health Education & Behavior, 37, 879–894. PubMed ID: 20980534 doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lincoln, Y.S., & Guba, E.G. (1985). Naturalistic inquiry. Beverley Hills, CA: Sage Publications.

  • McLeroy, K.R., Bibeau, D., Steckler, A., & Glanz, K. (1988). An ecological perspective on health promotion programs. Health Education Quarterly, 15, 351–377. PubMed ID: 3068205 doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • McMullen, J., Ní Chróinín, D., Tammelin, T., Pogorzelska, M., & van der Mars, H. (2015). International approaches to whole-of-school physical activity promotion. Quest, 67, 384–399. doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • National Center for Education Statistics. (2018, December 20). Search for public schools and school districts. Retrieved from https://nces.ed.gov/ccd/schoolsearch/

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Patton, I. (2012). Teachers’ perspectives of the daily physical activity program in Ontario. Physical and Health Education Journal, 78, 14–21.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Patton, M.Q. (2015). Qualitative research and evaluation methods (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

  • Society of Health and Physical Educators. (2016). Shape of the nation: Status of physical education in the USA. Reston, VA: Author.

  • Society of Health and Physical Educators. (2019, July 12). Every student succeeds act (ESSA). Retrieved from https://www.shapeamerica.org/advocacy/essa.aspx

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Solmon, M.A. (2015). Optimizing the role of physical education in promoting physical activity: A social-ecological approach. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 86, 329–337. PubMed ID: 26558638 doi:

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • U.S. Department of Education. (2016, September 6). Carol M. White physical education program. Retrieved from https://www2.ed.gov/programs/whitephysed/index.html

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • U.S. Department of Education. (2019, July 12). Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Retrieved from https://www.ed.gov/ESSA

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 19 19 19
Full Text Views 1 1 1
PDF Downloads 0 0 0