Research Ruminations and New Frontiers for Social Media Use for Professional Development and Learning in Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy

in Journal of Teaching in Physical Education
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  • 1 Elon University
  • 2 Ohio University
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This chapter compares and contrasts the findings of the preceding empirical monograph chapters. The findings from these chapters are addressed in terms of how they illustrate the positives, negatives, and tensions that can be associated with social media use for professional development and learning. Across the various chapters, similarities in findings as well as apparent contradictions are discussed. By illuminating the potential and the perils of social media use and misuse, a pragmatic summary of the findings can inform wise use and nonuse of social media for professional development and learning by those involved in the field of physical education and sport pedagogy. Although prior literature and this monograph have begun to address some aspects of social media use in physical education and sport pedagogy, much remains to be explored. Topics, social media tools, methods, and theory that could be taken up or expanded upon in future research to advance the field are suggested.

Carpenter is with Elon University, Elon, NC, USA. Harvey is with the Department of Recreation and Sport Pedagogy, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA.

Carpenter (jcarpenter13@elon.edu) is corresponding author.
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