The N-Pact Factor, Replication, Power, and Quantitative Research in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly

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In the current study, a 20-year span of 80 issues of articles (N = 196) in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly (APAQ) were examined. The authors sought to determine whether quantitative research published in APAQ, based on sample size, was underpowered, leading to the potential for false-positive results and findings that may not be reproducible. The median sample size, also known as the N-Pact Factor (NF), for all quantitative research published in APAQ was coded for correlational-type, quasi-experimental, and experimental research. The overall median sample size over the 20-year period examined was as follows: correlational type, NF = 112; quasi-experimental, NF = 40; and experimental, NF = 48. Four 5-year blocks were also analyzed to show historical trends. As the authors show, these results suggest that much of the quantitative research published in APAQ over the last 20 years was underpowered to detect small to moderate population effect sizes.

J. Martin is with the Div. of Kinesiology, Health, and Sport Studies, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. D. Martin is with Bloomfield Hills High School, Bloomfield Hills, MI, USA.

J. Martin (aa3975@wayne.edu) is corresponding author.
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