Kinesiology Faculty Reflections on COVID-19 and Future Directions in Online Education

in Kinesiology Review

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Kayla BakerUniversity of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA

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Melissa BoppDepartment of Kinesiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA

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Sean M. BulgerWest Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA

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YuChun ChenWestern Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA

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Michele L. DuffeyDepartment of Kinesiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA

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Brian MyersWestern Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA

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Dana K. VoelkerWest Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA

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Kaylee F. WoodardWestern Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA

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The COVID-19 pandemic proved to be an unprecedented disruptor on college and university campuses as stakeholders at all organizational levels were challenged to consider new approaches to teaching and learning using online course modalities with very limited preparation time and faculty support. Using a case study approach, this paper reviews valuable lessons learned through the experience, particularly regarding shifts in course delivery to include online and hybrid modalities on a widespread scale. Specifically, the authors reviewed the processes, outcomes, and student perceptions associated with online and hybrid course delivery in various kinesiology courses at three different higher education institutions. The paper also offers useful perspectives for kinesiology program administrators and faculty who are contemplating the continued application of online and hybrid course formats in greater capacity postpandemic.

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