Work-Integrated Learning in the Development of a Kinesiology Degree

in Kinesiology Review

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Kyle GuaySchool of Kinesiology, Capilano University, North Vancouver, BC, Canada

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Carey L. SimpsonSchool of Kinesiology, Capilano University, North Vancouver, BC, Canada

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Preparing kinesiology undergraduates with the foundational knowledge required by professional organizations is no longer enough when considering the skills students are required to demonstrate upon entering the job market. Work-integrated learning, embedded through curricular and cocurricular activities, has seen extensive growth in the posteducation landscape of Canadian institutions. With increasing expectations from future employers, graduates in the field of kinesiology require more experiential opportunities to meet these expectations. The aim of this paper is to provide commentary on how the Bachelor of Kinesiology program at Capilano University underwent the necessary changes to incorporate a required professional practice stream to align with industry expectations. The authors discuss the development of laddering course learning outcomes, course content, reflection, and student evaluation. Additionally, they provide rationale for its inclusion in the second year of the program.

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