Graduate Education From Physical Education to Kinesiology: Preparing the Next Generation

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Diane L. Gill Department of Kinesiology, University of North Carolina Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA

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In line with the 2023 conference theme, I first honor the past, then move to the present, and offer my views on embracing the future. In doing so, my theme is connection. That is, we need to hang together and connect with our professionals, our communities, and the public, as well as with each other. From our beginning in the late 1800s through much of our history, we were connected through physical education, but since the 1960s we have shifted away from physical education to disciplinary specializations and lost connections. Graduate programs, especially PhD programs, focus on preparing researchers in specialized areas. Although we no longer focus on physical education, we do have strong professional connections to the allied health areas. By strengthening our connections with our professionals and the public, we can make important contributions to the health and well-being of our communities and larger society and embrace the future.

Address author correspondence to dlgill@uncg.edu, https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6427-4703

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