Creating an Inclusive Culture and Climate That Supports Excellence in Kinesiology

in Kinesiology Review

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Patricia M. Lowrie
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Leah E. Robinson
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The continuing U.S. demographic shifts provide a substantial rationale for a corresponding transformation in the culture and climate of academic departments in higher education. In part, the response to the change is to increase the representation of people of color and others who have been historically absent from professional areas fed by the Kinesiology pipeline. However, the greater challenge is to understand and therefore, alter the internal culture. An intentional effort toward a culture of inclusion and full participation provides a working platform to transform existing practices and to cultivate policies from which emerging practices will offer opportunities for success. The understanding of the multiple identities of those within Kinesiology and the society served, the portals and gaps within the systemic architecture, and the methods of creating a multicultural organization—all play significant roles in contributing to change and transformation. Enlightened catalytic change agents must adopt new inclusive paradigms to prepare 21st century professionals with adaptive ideologies and behaviors for resolving future issues and challenges.

Lowrie is with the Office of the Provost and the College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. Robinson is with the School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL.

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