Summary and Conclusions: How Can We Help Enhance Diversity in Kinesiology?

in Kinesiology Review
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This article is divided into two major sections. First, the authors provided interpretations and conclusions about enhancing diversity in kinesiology based on the collection of articles for this Special Theme of the Kinesiology Review. There are six informative articles for this Special Theme on Diversity in Kinesiology that include Why We Should Care about Diversity in Kinesiology by Brooks, Harrison Jr., Norris, and Norwood; Diversity in Kinesiology: Theoretical and Contemporary Considerations by Hodge and Corbett; Creating an Inclusive Culture and Climate that Supports Excellence in Kinesiology by Lowrie and Robinson; Undergraduate Preparedness and Partnerships to Enhance Diversity in Kinesiology by Gregory-Bass, Williams, Blount, and Peters; Creating a Climate of Organizational DiversityModels of Best Practice by Keith and Russell; and this final article. Second, we identify strategies and provided recommendations to increase the presence and improve the experiences of Black and Hispanic faculty and students in kinesiology programs.

Hodge is with the Dept. of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Brooks is with the College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. Harrison, Jr. is with the Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Texas at Austin.

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