The Benefits and Challenges of Kinesiology as a Pre-Allied Health Degree

in Kinesiology Review
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This paper discusses some of the benefits and challenges of Kinesiology as a pre-allied health degree. Specifically, it highlights the impact of large enrollment growth on resources, course offerings, student experiences, student quality, and research. It is the author’s intent that this paper will stimulate discussion among Kinesiology programs and faculty to ensure that we are staying true to the recommended Kinesiology core and preparing our students to be future physical activity leaders while also providing the flexibility for students who are interested in pursuing graduate training in an allied health field.

The author is with is with the Dept of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

Address author correspondence to tim.brusseau@utah.edu.
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