Undergraduate Research in Kinesiology: Examples to Enhance Student Outcomes

in Kinesiology Review
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Undergraduate research is emphasized as a critical component of today’s science-based undergraduate education and widely accepted as an important part of the overall undergraduate education experience. While educators agree on the value of undergraduate research, significant challenges exist related to the design of the undergraduate research experience and the faculty member’s role in it. Additional challenges include providing high-quality research experiences that benefit the education of a large number of students while maintaining feasibility and cost-effectiveness. The scope of this review is to provide an overview of research and service-learning experiences in kinesiology departments at 3 institutions of higher learning that vary in size and mission.

Carson is with the College of Health Professions, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN. Petrellam and Marshall are with the Dept. of Kinesiology, Samford University, Birmingham, AL. Yingling, O, and Sherwood are with the Dept. of Kinesiology, California State University, East Bay, Hayward, CA.

Carson (jcarso16@uthsc.edu) is corresponding author.
Kinesiology Review
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