The Relationship Between Barrier Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis

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Previous reviews have highlighted the importance of self-efficacy beliefs in maintaining adequate levels of childhood physical activity (PA), but variable findings with different age groups and measures of PA indicate the need to quantify the extant literature. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to estimate the relationship between adolescents’ barrier self-efficacy (BSE) and PA behavior using a random-effects model and to examine age and type of PA measurement as potential relationship moderators. A systematic online database review yielded 38 articles up to June 2018. A small to moderate correlation between BSE beliefs and PA was noted, although the variability was considerable. Age and measurement timing were not significant moderators, but the type of measurement was a significant relationship moderator. This meta-analysis emphasizes the importance of BSE as a psychosocial correlate to PA behavior in young people. There is a need for further BSE–PA research with attention to measurement technique and developmental differences.

Hill is with the Dept. of Kinesiology, California State University, San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA. Feltz and Pfeiffer are with the Dept. of Kinesiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. Samendinger is with the Health Sciences Dept., Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA.

Hill (christopher.hill@csusb.edu) is corresponding author.
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