A Constant Balancing Act: Delivering Sustainable University Instructional Physical Activity Programs

in Kinesiology Review
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The goal of university instructional physical activity programs (IPAPs) is to provide quality instruction through best practices to encourage college students to lead healthy and physically active lifestyles. As IPAPs have continued to decline due to enrollment and budgetary concerns, the importance of quality and sustainability has become particularly paramount. Furthermore, it is imperative to the existence of IPAPs that we strive to learn and share with each other in order to independently survive, but more essentially to flourish collectively, as we are better together. In our varied experience, while some IPAPs face unique challenges, many obstacles are common, regardless of institution size and composition. This paper will offer the perspectives of four strikingly different colleges and universities in their quest to navigate challenges in delivery, maintain and support quality instruction, and advocate for IPAPs.

Brock and Russell are with the School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA. Beaudoin is with the Department of Movement Science, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI, USA. Urtel is with the Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), Indianapolis, IN, USA. Hicks is with the Department of Kinesiology, Health and Sport Sciences, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Brock (brocksj@auburn.edu) is corresponding author.
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