Aging Effects on Visual Reaction Time in a Single Task Condition and When Treadmill Walking

in Motor Control
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Visual reaction time (RT) was measured in 10 older men (mean age, 71.1 years) and gender-matched controls (mean age, 26.3 years) when standing (single task) and when walking on a motor-driven treadmill (dual task). There were 90 quasirandomly presented trials over 15 min in each condition. Longer mean and median RTs were observed in the dual task compared to the single task. Older males had significantly slower mean and median RTs (315 and 304 ms, respectively) than the younger group (273 and 266 ms, respectively) in both task conditions. There were no age or condition effects on within-subject variability. Both groups showed a trend of increasing RT over the 90 single task trials but when walking only the younger group slowed. These novel findings demonstrate high but sustained attention by older adults when walking. It is proposed that the motor task’s attentional demands might contribute to their slower preferred walking speed.

Sparrow and Parker are with the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia. Begg is with the Centre for Rehabilitation, Exercise and Sport Science, Victoria University of Technology, Victoria, Australia.

Motor Control
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