Amount of Kinematic Feedback Affects Learning of Speech Motor Skills

in Motor Control
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Knowledge of Performance (KP) feedback, such as biofeedback or kinematic feedback, is used to provide information on the nature and quality of movement responses for the purpose of guiding active learning or rehabilitation of motor skills. It has been proposed that KP feedback may interfere with long-term learning when provided throughout training. Here, twelve healthy English-speaking adults were trained to produce a trilled Russian [r] in words with KP kinematic feedback using electropalatography (EPG) and without KP (noKP). Five one-hour training sessions were provided over one week with testing pretraining and one day and one week posttraining. No group differences were found at pretraining or one day post training for production accuracy. A group by time interaction supported the hypothesis that providing kinematic feedback continually during skill acquisition interferes with retention.

Ballard, Smith, Paramatmuni, and McCabe are with the Discipline of Speech Pathology, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, Australia. Theodoros and Murdoch are with the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.