Emerging Behavioral Flexibility in Loop Writing: A longitudinal study in 7- to 9-Year-Old Primary School Children

in Motor Control

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Ida M. Bosga-StorkPraktijk Bosga-Stork

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Jurjen BosgaPraktijk Bosga-Stork

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Ruud G.J. MeulenbroekRadboud University

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The development of the ability to adapt one’s motor performance to the constraints of a movement task was examined in a longitudinal study involving 7 to-9-year-old children who were asked to perform a preparatory handwriting task. The capacity for sensorimotor synchronization was captured by the standard deviation of the relative phase between pacing signals and writing movements and the capacity to adjust wrist-finger coordination while performing repetitive movements was analyzed by autocorrelations of the vertical pen-tip displacements. While the capacity for synchronization improved with age, the autocorrelations were positive at short time lags only and hardly changed with age. A measure of “the long-term memory” of time series (Hurst exponent) confirmed that the findings were systematic rather than noise. Collectively, the results indicate that flexible movement strategies emerge early on in the first 3 years of formal handwriting education. Implications for educational and clinical practice are considered.

Bosga-Stork and Bosga are with the Praktijk Bosga-Stork, Doorn, Netherlands. Meulenbroek is with the Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior—Donders Centre for Cognition, Nijmegen, Netherlands.

Address author correspondence to Ida M. Bosga-Stork at idabosga@gmail.com.
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