Sensorimotor Strategies in Individuals With Poststroke Hemiparesis When Standing Up Without Vision

in Motor Control
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This study investigated the sensorimotor strategies for dynamic balance control in individuals with stroke by restricting sensory input that might influence task accomplishment. Sit-to-stand movements were performed with restricted vision by participants with hemiparesis and healthy controls. The authors evaluated the variability in the position of participants’ center of mass and velocity, and the center-of-pressure position, in each orthogonal direction at the lift-off point. When vision was restricted, the variability in the mediolateral center-of-pressure position decreased significantly in individuals with hemiparesis, but not in healthy controls. Participants with hemiparesis adopted strategies that explicitly differed from those used by healthy individuals. Variability may be decreased in the direction that most requires accuracy. Individuals with hemiparesis have been reported to have asymmetrical balance deficits, and that meant they had to prioritize mediolateral motion control to prevent falling. This study suggests that individuals with hemiparesis adopt strategies appropriate to their characteristics.

Kuramatsu and Izumi are with the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. Izumi is also with the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. Yamamoto is with the Research Center of Health, Physical Fitness and Sports, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan.

Kuramatsu (kuramatsuy@med.tohoku.ac.jp) is corresponding author.
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