The Relationship between Peak Oxygen Uptake and Physical Activity in 6- to 8-Year-Old Children

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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The relationship between physical activity measured using the LSI (Large Scale Integrated Activity Monitor), and questionnaire, with physical work capacity 170 (PWC 170) and aerobic capacity (peak V̇O2) was evaluated in 6- to 8-year-old children (n = 18). The mean (± SD) peak V̇O2 was 44.1 ± 5.6 ml • kg−1 • min−1. Peak V̇O2 was not significantly different for children (n = 8) who had completed two treadmill trials (45.4 vs. 43.5 ml • kg−1 • min−1; R = 0.67, p<0.05). The log LSI expressed as counts per hour (M ± SD = 2.1 ±.22 cts/hr) was the only activity method significantly related to peak V̇O2 (r = 0.59, p<0.05). The correlation between peak V̇O2 with the questionnaire was positive but nonsignificant (r = 0.20). PWC 170 was not related to peak V̇O2 (r = 0.21) or the activity variables (r = 0.12 questionnaire; r = 0.18 log LSI). When the group was divided into high and low peak V̇O2 groups (high: M = 48.8 ml • kg−1 • min−1; low: M = 39.5 ml • kg−1 • min−1), the log LSI was able to distinguish significant differences in activity levels (high: 2.23 ±. 19 cts/hr; low: 1.99±.19 cts/hr). This study suggests that activity measured with the LSI and aerobic capacity are related in this sample of 6- to 8-year-old children.

Juliane R. Fenster, Patty S. Freedson, and Richard A. Washburn are with the Department of Exercise Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003. R. Curtis Ellison is with the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA 01655.