Parental Influence on Children’s Cognitive and Affective Responses to Competitive Soccer Participation

in Pediatric Exercise Science
View More View Less
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year online subscription

USD  $69.00

1 year online subscription

USD  $92.00

Student 2 year online subscription

USD  $131.00

2 year online subscription

USD  $175.00

This study examined the relationship between children’s perceptions of parental influence and their psychosocial responses to competitive soccer participation. Female (n = 114) and male (n = 113) athletes completed self-reports of soccer competence, enjoyment, intrinsic motivation, and parents’ influence on their participation. Mothers (n = 160) and fathers (n = 123) reported their own attitudes and behaviors toward their child’s participation. Regression analyses revealed that mothers and fathers who were perceived as positive exercise role models, who had more positive beliefs about their child’s competency, and who gave more frequent positive contingent responses to performance successes were associated with athletes who had higher perceived competence, enjoyment, and intrinsic motivation. Children who also perceived their fathers as being more involved in their soccer participation and exerting lower amounts of pressure to perform had more positive psychosocial responses. However, a nonsignificant relationship was found for mother and father reported influence with children’s psychosocial responses.

M.L. Babkes is a doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO 80639. M.R. Weiss is with the Health and Physical Education Program in the Department of Human Services at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1026 726 75
Full Text Views 37 22 1
PDF Downloads 41 25 1