The Influence of Reflected Appraisals on Middle School and High School Athletes’ Self-Perceptions of Sport Competence

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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This study examined the reflected appraisal process in female middle school (n = 66; M age = 12.39 – .87 years) and high school athletes (n = 88; M age = 14.70 – 1.08 years). Questionnaires assessed the athletes’ self-perceptions of sport competence and how they perceived their mothers, fathers, coaches, and teammates evaluated their ability in sport. A multiple regression analysis revealed that the various reflected appraisals predicted self-perceptions of competence (p < .01, R2 = .65). Mothers (β = .19), coaches (β = .24), and teammates (β = .47) were each significant predictors, while the reflected appraisal of fathers (β = .08) was non-significant. Squared semi-partial correlations indicated that teammates accounted the greatest amount of unique (sr2 = .25), followed by coaches (sr2 = .08), mothers (sr2 = .05), and fathers (sr2 = .01). Structural equation modeling indicated that the pattern of relationships was the same for middle school and high school athletes.

The author is with the School of Kinesiology and Recreation, Illinois State University, Normal, IL.

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