Activity Levels, Dietary Energy Intake, and Body Composition in Children Who Walk to School

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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Although differences in daily activity levels have been assessed in cross-sectional walk-to-school studies, no one has assessed differences in body composition and dietary energy intake at the same time. In this study of 239 primary school children, there were no significant differences in daily activity levels, body composition, or estimated dietary energy intake between those who walk to school (WALK) and those who travel by car (CAR; p < .05). WALK children were more active between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. than CAR children (p < .05). In addition, there were no significant differences in the main analysis when participants were subgrouped by gender and age.

Ford, Coleman, Woolf-May, and Swaine are with the Dept. of Sports Science, Tourism and Leisure, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, England. Bailey is with the School of Education, Roehampton University, London, England.