Plyometric Training Does Not Affect Central and Peripheral Muscle Fatigue Differently in Prepubertal Girls and Boys

in Pediatric Exercise Science
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $68.00

1 year subscription

USD $90.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $129.00

2 year subscription

USD $168.00

The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of plyometric training (PT) on central and peripheral (muscle) fatigue in prepubertal girls and boys. The boys (n = 13, age 10.3 ± 0.3 years) and girls (n = 13, age, 10.2 ± 0.3 years) performed continuous 2-min maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) before and after 16 high-intensity PT sessions. PT comprised two training sessions per week of 30 jumps in each session with 20 s between jumps. The greatest effect of PT was on excitation–contraction coupling, (twitch force increased by 323% in boys and 21% in girls) and height of a counter–movement jump (increased by 37% in boys and 38% in girls). In contrast, the quadriceps voluntary activation index, central activation ratio, and MVC did not change significantly after PT. The thickness of the quadriceps muscle increased by 9% in boys and 14% in girls after PT. In conclusion, boys and girls demonstrated similar changes in indicators of central fatigue (50–60% decrease) and peripheral fatigue (45–55% decrease) after MVC before and after PT.

Skurvydas and Brazaitis are with the Dept. of Applied Physiology and Physiotherapy, Lithuanian Academy of Physical Education, Kaunas, Lithuania.

Pediatric Exercise Science
Article Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 13 13 5
Full Text Views 0 0 0
PDF Downloads 0 0 0
Altmetric Badge
PubMed
Google Scholar
Cited By