Time-of-Day Effects on Short-Term Exercise Performances in 10- to 11-Year-Old Boys

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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The purpose of this study was to examine the time-of-day effects on short-term performances in boys. In a balanced and randomized study design, 20 boys performed four anaerobic tests of strength and power (grip strength, Squat-Jump, Five-jump and cycle Wingate tests) at 08:00, 14:00 and 18:00 hr on separate days. The results showed a time-of-day effect on oral temperature. Analysis of variance revealed a significant time-of-day effect for short-term performances for strength, cycle, and jump tests. The post hoc analysis revealed that performances improved significantly from morning to afternoon but no significant differences were noticed between 14:00 and 18:00 hr. The differences between the morning and the afternoon (the highest value measured either at 14:00 or at 18:00 hr) reached 5.9% for grip strength, 3.5% for the squat jump test, 5% for the five jump test, and 5.5% for Ppeak and 6% for Pmean during the Wingate test. A significant positive correlation was found between temperature and short-term performances. In conclusion, a time-of-day effect in the child’s maximal short-term exercise performances exists in relation with core temperature. Such variations would have pronounced effects when expressed in training programs and competitions.

H. Souissi, Chaouachi, Chamari, and N. Souissi are with the Research Laboratory Sports Performance Optimization National Center of Medicine and Science in Sports (CNMSS), Tunis, Tunisia. Dogui is with the Dept. of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine Monastir, Tunisia. Amri is with the Laboratory of Functional Neurophysiology and Pathology, Faculty of Sciences, Tunis, Tunisia.