The Contribution of Youth Sport Football to Weekend Physical Activity for Males Aged 9 to 16 Years: Variability Related to Age and Playing Position

Click name to view affiliation

Sally A.M. Fenton University of Birmingham

Search for other papers by Sally A.M. Fenton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Joan L. Duda University of Birmingham

Search for other papers by Joan L. Duda in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Timothy Barrett University of Birmingham

Search for other papers by Timothy Barrett in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

The aims of this study were (1) to determine minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) and vigorous PA accrued in youth sport football (also internationally referred to as soccer), and the contribution toward daily weekend moderate-to-vigorous PA and vigorous PA for males aged 9-16 years, and (2) to investigate variability in these outcomes related to age and playing position. One hundred and nine male grassroots footballers (Mean age = 11.98 ± 1.75 years) wore a GT3x accelerometer for 7 days. Weekend youth sport football participation and playing position were recorded. Youth sport football moderate-to-vigorous PA (M = 51.51 ± 17.99) and vigorous PA (M = 27.78 ± 14.55) contributed 60.27% and 70.68% toward daily weekend moderate-to-vigorous PA and vigorous PA, respectively. Overall, 36.70% of participants accumulated ≥60 min moderate-to-vigorous PA and 69.70% accrued < 20 min of vigorous PA during youth sport. For participants aged 13 to16 years, youth sport football moderate-to-vigorous PA and vigorous PA were significantly higher, and contributed a greater amount toward daily weekend moderate-to-vigorous PA and vigorous PA than for participants aged 9-12 years (p = >.01). Youth sport football is an important source of moderate-to-vigorous PA and vigorous PA at the weekend for male youth, and particularly for adolescents. Participation may offer opportunity for weekend engagement in vigorous PA toward health enhancing levels.

The authors are with the School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

Address author correspondence to Sally A.M. Fenton at s.a.m.fenton@bham.ac.uk.
  • Collapse
  • Expand
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1610 130 10
Full Text Views 26 20 2
PDF Downloads 21 6 3