Associations Between Home Environment and After-School Physical Activity and Sedentary Time Among 6th Grade Children

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Erica Y. Lau University of South Carolina

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Daheia J. Barr-Anderson University of South Carolina

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Marsha Dowda University of South Carolina

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Melinda Forthofer University of South Carolina

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Ruth P. Saunders University of South Carolina

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Russell R. Pate University of South Carolina

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This study examined associations of various elements of the home environment with after-school physical activity and sedentary time in 671 6th-grade children (Mage = 11.49 ± 0.5 years). Children’s after-school total physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and sedentary time were measured by accelerometry. Parents completed surveys assessing elements of the home social and physical environment. Mixed-model regression analyses were used to examine the associations between each element of the home environment and children’s after-school physical activity and sedentary time. Availability of home physical activity resources was associated positively with after-school total physical activity and negatively with after-school sedentary time in boys. Parental support was associated positively with after-school total physical activity and MVPA and negatively with after-school sedentary time in girls. The home physical environment was associated with boys’ after-school physical activity and sedentary time, whereas the home social environment was associated with girls’ after-school physical activity and sedentary time.

Lau, Barr-Anderson, Dowda, and Pate are with the Dept. of Exercise Science, Forthofer the Dept. of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Saunders the Dept. of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.

Address author correspondence to Erica Y. Lau at lauy@email.sc.edu.
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