Endocrinology and Pediatric Exercise Science—The Year That Was 2017

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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The Pediatric Exercise Science “Year That Was” section aims to highlight the most important (to the author’s opinion) manuscripts that were published in 2017 in the field of endocrinology and pediatric exercise science. This year’s selection includes studies showing that 1) in pubertal swimmers, there is a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) during intense training (a catabolic-type hormonal response) with an anabolic “rebound” characterized by a significant increase of these growth factors during training tapering down. Moreover, it was shown that changes of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 paralleled changes in peak and average force but not with endurance properties, showing decreases during intense training and increases during tapering; 2) a meta-analysis showing that growth hormone administration elicits significant changes in body composition and possible limited effect on anaerobic performance but does not increase either muscle strength or aerobic exercise capacity in healthy, young subjects; and 3) short-term exercise intervention can prevent the development of polycystic ovary syndrome in a dose-dependent manner in letrozole-induced polycystic ovary syndrome rat model with high-intensity exercise being most effective. The implication of these studies to the pediatric population, their importance, and the new research avenues that were opened by these studies is emphasized.

Eliakim is with the Dept. of Pediatrics, Meir Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Address author correspondence to Alon Eliakim at eliakim.alon@clalit.org.il.
  • 1.

    Badawy A, Elnashar A. Treatment options for polycystic ovary syndrome. Int J Womens Health. 2011;3:25–35. PubMed doi:10.2147/IJWH.S11304

  • 2.

    Ben Zaken S, Meckel Y, Dror N, Nemet D, Eliakim A. IGF-I and IGF-I receptor polymorphisms among elite swimmers. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2014;26:470–6. PubMed doi:10.1123/pes.2014-0158

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  • 3.

    Ben Zaken S, Meckel Y, Nemet D, Eliakim A. Can IGF-I polymorphism affect power and endurance athletic performance? Growth Horm IGF Res. 2013;23:175–8. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.ghir.2013.06.005

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  • 4.

    Boesen AP, Dideriksen K, Couppé C, et al. Tendon and skeletal muscle matrix gene expression and functional responses to immobilization and rehabilitation in young males: effect of growth hormone administration. J Physiol. 2013;591:6039–52. PubMed doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2013.261263

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  • 5.

    Cao SF, Hu WL, Wu MM, Jiang LY. Effects of exercise intervention on preventing letrozole-exposed rats from polycystic ovary syndrome. Reprod Sci. 2017;24(3):456–62. PubMed doi:10.1177/1933719116657892

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  • 6.

    Capalbo D, Barbieri F, Improda N, et al. Growth hormone improves cardiopulmonary capacity in children with growth hormone deficiency. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017;102(11):4080–8. PubMed doi:10.1210/jc.2017-00871

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  • 7.

    Doessing S, Kjaer M. Growth hormone and connective tissue in exercise. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2005;15:202–10. PubMed doi:10.1111/j.1600-0838.2005.00455.x

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  • 8.

    Eliakim A, Nemet D. The endocrine response to exercise and training in young athletes. Pediatr Exerc Sci. 2013;25:605–15. PubMed doi:10.1123/pes.25.4.605

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    Eliakim A, Nemet D, Bar-Sela S, Higer Y, Falk B. Changes in circulating IGF-I and their correlation with self-assessment and fitness among elite athletes. Int J Sports Med. 2002;23(8):600–3. PubMed doi:10.1055/s-2002-35544

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  • 10.

    Hermansen K, Bengtsen M, Kjær M, Vestergaard P, Jørgensen JOL. Impact of GH administration on athletic performance in healthy young adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials. Growth Horm IGF Res. 2017;34:38–44. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.ghir.2017.05.005

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  • 11.

    Legro RS, Arslanian SA, Ehrmann DA, et al. Diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome: an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013;98(12):4565–92. PubMed doi:10.1210/jc.2013-2350

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  • 12.

    Maimoun L, Galy O, Manetta J, et al. Competitive season of triathlon does not alter bone metabolism and bone mineral status in male triathletes. Int J Sports Med. 2004;25(3):230–4. PubMed doi:10.1055/s-2003-45257

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  • 13.

    March WA, Moore VM, Willson KJ, Phillips DI, Norman RJ, Davies MJ. The prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in a community sample assessed under contrasting diagnostic criteria. Hum Reprod. 2010;25(2):544–51. PubMed doi:10.1093/humrep/dep399

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  • 14.

    Meinhardt U, Nelson AE, Hansen JL, et al. The effects of growth hormone on body composition and physical performance in recreational athletes: a randomized trial. Ann Intern Med. 2010;152:568–77. PubMed doi:10.7326/0003-4819-152-9-201005040-00007

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  • 15.

    Mejri S, Bchir F, Ben Rayana MC, Ben HJ, Ben SC. Effect of training on GH and IGF-1 responses to a submaximal exercise in football players. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2005;95(5–6):496–503. PubMed doi:10.1007/s00421-005-0007-6

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    Moran LJ, Brinkworth G, Noakes M, Norman RJ. Effects of lifestyle modification in polycystic ovarian syndrome. Reprod Biomed Online. 2006;12(5):569–78. PubMed doi:10.1016/S1472-6483(10)61182-0

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  • 17.

    Nemet D, Pontello AM, Rose-Gottron C, Cooper DM. Cytokines and growth factors during and after a wrestling season in adolescent boys. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004;36(5):794–800. PubMed doi:10.1249/01.MSS.0000126804.30437.52

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  • 18.

    Saugy M, Robinson N, Saudan C, Baume N, Avois L, Mangin P. Human growth hormone doping in sport. Br J Sports Med. 2006;40:35–9. PubMed doi:10.1136/bjsm.2006.027573

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  • 19.

    Steinacker JM, Lormes W, Kellmann M, et al. Training of junior rowers before world championships. Effects on performance, mood state and selected hormonal and metabolic responses. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2000;40(4):327–35. PubMed

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  • 20.

    Tourinho Filho H, Pires M, Puggina EF, Papoti M, Barbieri R, Martinelli CE Jr. Serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS concentrations and physical performance in young swimmers during a training season. Growth Horm IGF Res. 2017;32:49–54. PubMed doi:10.1016/j.ghir.2016.12.004

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  • 21.

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