The CHANGE! Project: Changes in Body Composition and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in 10- to 11-Year-Old Children After Completing the CHANGE! Intervention

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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Purpose: To assess the effects of the Children’s Health, Activity and Nutrition: Get Educated! intervention on body size, body composition, and peak oxygen uptake in a subsample of 10- to 11-year-old children. Methods: Sixty children were recruited from 12 schools (N = 6 intervention) to take part in the CHANGE! subsample study. Baseline, postintervention, and follow-up measures were completed in October 2010, March–April 2011, and June–July 2011, respectively. Outcome measures were body mass index z score, waist circumference, body composition assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (baseline and follow-up only), and peak oxygen uptake. Results: Significant differences in mean trunk fat mass (control = 4.72 kg, intervention = 3.11 kg, P = .041) and trunk fat % (control = 23.08%, intervention = 17.75%, P = .022) between groups were observed at follow-up. Significant differences in waist circumference change scores from baseline to follow-up were observed between groups (control = 1.3 cm, intervention = −0.2 cm, P = .023). Favorable changes in body composition were observed in the intervention group; however, none of these changes reached statistical significance. No significant differences in peak oxygen uptake were observed. Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest the multicomponent curriculum intervention had small to medium beneficial effects on body size and composition health outcomes.

Dagger is with the School of Health Sciences, Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, United Kingdom. Davies is with the Faculty of Education, Health and Community, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom. Mackintosh is with the Applied Sports Science Technology and Medicine Research Centre (A-STEM), College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom. Stone is with the Faculty of Health and Social Care, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, Lancashire, United Kingdom. George and Boddy are with the Physical Activity Exchange, Research Institute for Sports and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom. Fairclough is with the Dept. of Sport and Physical Activity, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom; and the Dept. of Physical Education and Sports Science, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Rebecca M. Dagger was previously known as Rebecca M. Gobbi. Genevieve L. Stone was previously known as Genevieve L. Warburton.

Address author correspondence to Lynne M. Boddy at L.M.Boddy@ljmu.ac.uk.
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