Reliability and Validity of Tethered Swimming Lactate Minimum Test and Their Relationship With Performance in Young Swimmers

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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Purpose: To test the reliability and validity of tethered swimming lactate minimum test in young swimmers. Methods: Lactate minimum test was performed twice to test the reliability (experiment 1; n = 13). In addition, the validity was investigated through lactate minimum test relationships with tethered swimming lactate threshold and peak force obtained during graded exercise test (experiment 2; n = 11). Finally, the correlations with mean speeds observed during 200-m (s200m) and 30-minute continuous efforts (s30min) were also analyzed (experiment 3; n = 15). In all experiments, the lactate minimum test began with 3-minute all-out effort to induce lactatemia, followed by an exhaustive graded exercise test. Results: The lactate minimum intensity and mean force during the entire 3-minute all-out effort (MF) showed high reliability (coefficient of variation < 8.9% and intraclass correlation coefficient > .93). The lactate minimum intensity was not different compared with lactate threshold (P = .22), presenting high correlations (r = .92) and agreement (95% limits of agreement = ±7.9 N). The mean force during the entire 3-minute all-out effort was similar to peak force obtained during graded exercise test (P = .41), presenting significant correlations (r = .88) and high indices of agreement (95% limits of agreement = ±11.3 N). In addition, lactate minimum test parameters correlated both with mean speeds observed during 200-m (r > .74) and 30-minute continuous efforts (r > .70). Conclusion: Thus, tethered swimming lactate minimum test can be used for training recommendations and to monitor aerobic adaptations in young swimmers.

Kalva-Filho, Silva, Loures, and Papoti are with the Graduate Program in Rehabilitation and Functional Performance, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. Toubekis is with the Division of Aquatic Sports, School of Physical Education and Sport Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. Zagatto is with the Dept. of Physical Education, São Paulo State University, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil. Silva and Papoti are also with the School of Physical Education and Sports of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. Campos is with the Dept. of Physical Education, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.

Address author correspondence to Marcelo Papoti at mpapoti@yahoo.com.br.

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