Sports Participation Decreases the Incidence of Traumatic, Nonsports-Related Fractures Among Adolescents

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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Objectives: To investigate the effects of different sports on the incidence of traumatic fractures (TF; sport-related fractures and those occurring in daily activities) among adolescents during the 9-month follow-up period. Methods: The adolescents were contacted in 11 different locations (3 public/private schools and 8 sports clubs), and the final sample was divided into 3 groups: control (n = 121), swimming (n = 51), and impact sports (n = 142). The incidence of TF was calculated by considering the exposure to sports (TF/1000 h). Results: In the overall sample, the incidence of TF was 1.29 TF/1000 hours of sports exposure, while the incidence of sport-related TF was 0.39 TF/1000 hours of sports exposure. Adolescents engaged in sports (P = .004), independently of type (P = .001), for 3 or more days per week (P = .004) and more than 60 minutes per day (P = .001) had lower incidence of TF. Adolescents engaged in more than 300 minutes per week of sport (0.17 TF/1000 h) had lower incidence than those who did not (2.06 TF/1000 h [P = .001]). A similar finding was observed for sport-related TF (≥300 min/wk: 0.08 TF/1000 h vs 300 min/wk: 0.615 TF/1000 h [P = .02]). Conclusion: Adolescents engaged in sports showed a lower incidence of TF than nonengaged adolescents.

Lynch, Turi-Lynch, Ito, Luiz-de-Marco, Rodrigues-Junior, and Fernandes are with the Laboratory of InVestigation in Exercise (LIVE), Department of Physical Education, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, Brazil. Lynch, Turi-Lynch, Agostinete, Ito, Rodrigues-Junior, and Fernandes are with the Post-Graduation Program in Kinesiology, Institute of Biosciences, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rio Claro, Brazil. Fredericson is with the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Fernandes is with the Post-Graduation Program in Physical Therapy, Department of Physical Therapy, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, Brazil.

Lynch (kyle.lynch.sc@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
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