Comparison of Habitual Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Adolescents and Young Adults With and Without Cerebral Palsy

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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Purpose: The comparison of habitual physical activity and sedentary time in teenagers and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) with typically developed (TD) peers can serve to quantify activity shortcomings. Methods: Patterns of sedentary, upright, standing, and walking components of habitual physical activity were compared in age-matched (16.8 y) groups of 54 youths with bilateral spastic CP (38 who walk with limitations and 16 who require mobility devices) and 41 TD youths in the Middle East. Activity and sedentary behavior were measured over 96 hours by activPAL3 physical activity monitors. Results: Participants with CP spent more time sedentary (8%) and sitting (37%) and less time standing (20%) and walking (40%) than TD (all Ps < .01). These trends were enhanced in the participants with CP requiring mobility devices. Shorter sedentary events (those <60-min duration) were similar for TD and CP groups, but CP had significantly more long sedentary events (>2 h) and significantly fewer upright events (taking <30, 30–60, and >60 min) and less total upright time than TD. Conclusion: Ambulant participants with CP, as well as TD youth must be encouraged to take more breaks from being sedentary and include more frequent and longer upright events.

Aviram, Raanan, and Bar-Haim are with the Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Harries is with the Human Motion Analysis Laboratory, Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin, Israel. Shkedy Rabani is with the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel. Amro is with the Department of Physical Therapy, Al-Quds University, Abu Dees, Jerusalem. Nammourah is with the Department of Physical Therapy, Jerusalem Princess Basma Center for Disabled Children, Jerusalem, East Jerusalem. Al-Jarrah is with the Department of Physical Therapy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan. Hutzler is with the Graduate School of Wingate Academic College, Netanya, Israel.

Bar-Haim (barhaims@bgu.ac.il) is corresponding author.
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