Improved Motor Proficiency and Quality of Life in Youth With Prader–Willi Syndrome and Obesity 6 Months After Completing a Parent-Led, Game-Based Intervention

in Pediatric Exercise Science

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Daniela A. RubinCalifornia State University Fullerton

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Kathleen S. WilsonCalifornia State University Fullerton

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Jared M. TuckerHelen DeVos Children’s Hospital
Michigan State University

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Diobel M. CastnerCalifornia State University Fullerton

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Marilyn C. Dumont-DriscollMichigan State University

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Debra J. RoseCalifornia State University Fullerton

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Purpose: To determine changes and potential differences in physical activity (PA), gross motor proficiency (MP), and health parameters after a 6-month follow-up (FU) period following participation in a parent-led PA intervention in youth with or without Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS). Methods: About 42 youth with PWS and 65 youth without PWS but with obesity (body fat percentage >95th percentile for age and sex), aged 8–16 years, participated. The intervention included preplanned PA sessions containing playground and console-based video games scheduled 4 days per week for 24 weeks. Families received training and curriculum materials. PA (accelerometry), MP (Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of MP), and health-related quality of life were obtained before (PRE), after completing the intervention (POST), and at FU. Results: There were no significant changes in PA at any time point. At FU and POST, participants showed higher bilateral coordination (PRE = 9.3 [0.4], POST = 11.7 [0.5], and FU = 11.1 [0.6]); speed and agility (PRE = 9.2 [0.4], POST = 10.8 [0.4], and FU = 11.5 [0.5]); and strength (PRE = 8.0 [0.3], POST = 9.2 [0.3], and FU = 9.2 [0.3]) than at PRE. At FU (80.3 [2.1]) and POST (79.8 [1.7]), youth without PWS showed higher health-related quality of life than PRE (75.0 [1.8]). Conclusion: The improvements in MP and health-related quality of life at FU suggest long-term durability of intervention outcomes.

Rubin, Wilson, Castner, and Rose are with the Department of Kinesiology, California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA, USA. Tucker is with Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI, USA. Tucker is also with the Department of Human Movement, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI, USA. Dumont-Driscoll is with the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Rubin (drubin@fullerton.edu) is corresponding author.
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