Interdependencies between the Perceived and Self-Reported Goal Orientations of Young Athletes and Their Parents

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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This study examined the interrelationships between young athletes’ and parents’ personal and perceived goal orientations in sport. Forty-three boys and 34 girls who were involved in a summer basketball camp completed the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ) with respect to their own dispositional goal perspective in basketball and their perceptions of the goal orientation of the parent who was most involved with their basketball participation. The parents (55 mothers and 21 fathers) responded to the TEOSQ in tenns of their personal goal orientation and their perceptions of the goal orientation held by their child in basketball. Results revealed no significant correlations between children’s and parents’ self-reported task and ego orientation. Children’s goal orientation was significantly related to their views concerning the goal orientation adopted by their patents. The implications of these findings for understanding the socialization of sport goal orientations are discussed.

Joan L. Duda is with the Dept. of Health, Kinesiology, and Leisure Studies at Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. Harry L. Horn, Jr., is with the Dept. of Psychology at Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, MO 65804.

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