Cardiometabolic and Perceptual Responses to Body-Weight Resistance High-Intensity Interval Exercise in Boys

in Pediatric Exercise Science
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  • 1 Michigan State University
  • 2 California State University—San Marcos
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The majority of studies examining children’s responses to high-intensity interval exercise primarily utilized running; however, this modality does not require/include other important aspects of physical activity including muscular fitness. Purpose: To compare acute responses between a body weight resistance exercise circuit (CIRC) and treadmill-based (TM) high-intensity interval exercise. Method: A total of 17 boys (age = 9.7 [1.3] y) completed a graded exercise test to determine peak heart rate, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), and maximal aerobic speed. Sessions were randomized and counterbalanced. CIRC required 2 sets of 30-second maximal repetitions of 4 exercises. TM included eight 30-second bouts of running at 100% maximal aerobic speed. Both included 30-second active recovery between bouts. Blood lactate concentration was measured preexercise and postexercise. Rating of perceived exertion, affective valence, and enjoyment were recorded preexercise, after intervals 3 and 6, and postexercise. Results: Participants attained 88% (5%) peak heart rate and 74% (9%) VO2peak for CIRC and 89% (4%) peak heart rate and 81% (6%) VO2peak for TM, with a significant difference in percentage of VO2peak (P = .003) between protocols. Postexercise blood lactate concentration was higher following CIRC (5.0 [0.7] mM) versus TM (2.0 [0.3] mM) (P < .001). Rating of perceived exertion, affective valence, and enjoyment responses did not differ between protocols (P > .05). Conclusion: HR responses were near maximal during CIRC, supporting that this body-weight circuit is representative of high-intensity interval exercise.

Ricci, Currie, and Pfeiffer are with the Department of Kinesiology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA. Astorino is with the Department of Kinesiology, California State University—San Marcos, San Marcos, CA, USA.

Ricci (riccijea@msu.edu) is corresponding author.
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