Perceived Barriers and Sources of Support for Undergraduate Female Students’ Persistence in the Sport Management Major

in Sport Management Education Journal
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Male undergraduate sport management majors substantially outnumber females, suggesting that the path to a career in the sport industry is male dominated and gender stereotypes may exist. Simultaneously, there is a dearth of research on females’ experiences while enrolled in higher education and within sport management career development. Through qualitative focus groups conducted at two institutions with female sport management majors, this research sought to understand the barriers and sources of support that female students perceive while engaged in this academic discipline. The authors identified four themes—otherness, roles and credibility, prior experiences, and people of influence—all of which help illuminate the lived experience of gender bias among women in the sport management major and generate suggestions for the creation of more inclusive environments that foster persistence.

Sauder and Mudrick are with York College of Pennsylvania, York, PA. DeLuca is with Towson University, Towson, MD.

Address author correspondence to Molly Hayes Sauder at msauder@ycp.edu.
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