Testing the Learning Styles Hypothesis: An Assessment of the Learning Styles, Learning Approaches, and Course Outcomes in the Sport Management Classroom

in Sport Management Education Journal
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Increasing student persistence rates is imperative in higher education, as less than 60% of those who initially enroll in college full-time finish with a certificate or degree. Educators must ensure students are engaged with many facets of their educational experiences. Two strategies through which educators can engage students in the classroom, approaches to learning and learning styles, were examined. Researchers then assessed the relationships between these strategies and student success in the course (quiz scores and overall course grade). Findings suggest that the self-reported learning styles of students enrolled in sport management courses have little impact on student success. Thus, support was not found for the learning styles hypothesis. However, approaches to learning warrant attention, as students who employ strategic study skills are likely to achieve significantly higher course outcomes compared with those who utilize deep or surface study skills in the sport management discipline.

The authors are with the Department of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.

Shreffler (megan.shreffler@louisville.edu) is corresponding author.
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