“I Feel We are Inclusive Enough”: Examining Swimming Coaches’ Understandings of Inclusion and Disability

in Sociology of Sport Journal
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In this study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight Victorian swimming coaches to examine the discourses of disability1 and inclusion that they expressed in relation to their current coaching practices. Analysis specifically pursued links between neoliberalism, ableism, elitism, classification and inclusion in coaching, with the intention of exploring what discourse relations are possible, imaginable and practical within what have been referred to as neoliberal-ableist times. Findings reveal that coaches replicate and reproduce elitist, ableist assumptions about the body and sport. The discussion prompts a consideration of how rationalities and techniques of inclusion are limited under the prevailing political context.

Hammond is with the School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Jeanes, Penney, and Leahy are with the Faculty of Education, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Penney is also with the School of Education, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia.

Address author correspondence to Andrew Hammond at andrew.hammond@ubc.ca.
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