NCAA Division I Athletes’ Attitudes Toward Seeking Sport Psychology Consultation: The Development of an Objective Instrument

in The Sport Psychologist
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A 50-item questionnaire measuring athletes’ attitudes toward seeking a sport psychology consultant (ATSSPCQ) was initially developed and then administered to 48 African American and 177 Caucasian student-athletes at a NCAA Division I university. Principal components factor analyses were conducted to extract initial factors and then varimax orthogonal rotation was performed. The analyses produced three dimensions of athlete attitude that accounted for 35% of the variance: stigma tolerance, confidence in a SPC/recognition of need, and interpersonal openness/willingness to try a SPC. A MANOVA and follow-up discriminant function analyses were then performed to identify the factors that maximized differences between gender and race. Significant differences in stigma tolerance were found for both gender and race. SPCs were stigmatized more by male athletes than by female athletes and more by African American athletes than by Caucasian athletes. No other significant effects were obtained.

Scott B. Martin is with the Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation at the University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203. Craig A. Wrisberg and Patricia A. Beitel both are with the Cultural Studies Unit and John Lounsbury is with the Department of Psychology, all at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

The Sport Psychologist
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