Xs and Os and What the Coach Knows: Improving Team Strategy through Critical Thinking

Click name to view affiliation

William B. Strean University of Alberta

Search for other papers by William B. Strean in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Kim L. Senecal University of Alberta

Search for other papers by Kim L. Senecal in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Stephen G. Howlett University of Alberta

Search for other papers by Stephen G. Howlett in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
J. Mark Burgess University of Alberta

Search for other papers by J. Mark Burgess in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Critical thinking can be defined most simply as thinking that assesses itself (Paul, 1995). We explored the degree to which coaches engage in critical thinking about strategy. We used Brookfield’s (1995) critical thinking model to examine coaches’ strategic thinking processes. The merit of the model as a tool to facilitate research and intervention in team sports was considered. We examined whether identifying and examining paradigmatic, prescriptive, and causal assumptions, as well as exploring alternatives for thinking and acting, can improve team strategy. The results provide examples of these various conceptual categories. The data support the use of Brookfield’s (1995) model for understanding and intervening with coaches and athletes. Examples of how sport psychology and performance enhancement consultants might use this model in their work are offered.

William Strean, Kim L. Senecal, and Stephen G. Howlett are all with the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, and J. Mark Burgess is with the Department of Psychology, at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H9.

  • Collapse
  • Expand
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 1862 123 20
Full Text Views 123 14 0
PDF Downloads 86 3 0