Reflecting on Initiating Sport Psychology Consultation: A Self-Narrative of Neophyte Practice

in The Sport Psychologist
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD  $68.00

1 year subscription

USD  $90.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD  $129.00

2 year subscription

USD  $168.00

Few studies have considered specific factors of service delivery in applied sport psychology that might contribute to successful outcomes (Petitpas, Giges, & Danish, 1999). It has been suggested that the sport psychology consultant (SPC)-athlete relationship is at the core of athlete-centered approaches (Petitpas et al., 1999; Ravizza, 1990; Thompson, 1998). The purposes of this paper are to discuss issues related to (a) professional education, training, and the role of supervision in the SPC service delivery process; (b) the SPC-athlete relationship; and (c) the need for reflective practice in applied sport psychology. A narrative of self (Sparkes, 2000) is presented by a trainee SPC to demonstrate the practicality of Tripp’s (1993) critical incident reflection exercise. Issues arising from an initial intake meeting with a competitive athlete are reflected upon and analyzed. Reflection is suggested as a tool for education and supervision in applied sport psychology.

Nick Holt is a Doctoral Candidate, and Billy Strean is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Alberta.

Direct correspondence to Nick Holt, Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta Canada T6G 2H9. E-mail: <nlholt@ualberta.ca>.
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 341 330 13
Full Text Views 52 52 2
PDF Downloads 77 77 2