The Effect of Imagery Function and Imagery Direction on Self-Efficacy and Performance on a Golf-Putting Task

in The Sport Psychologist
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This experiment examined the interaction between two imagery functions (Cognitive Specific, CS; and Motivation - General Mastery, MG-M) and two imagery directions (facilitative, debilitative) on self-efficacy and performance in golf putting. Eighty-three participants were randomly assigned to one of 7 conditions: (a) CS + facilitative imagery, (b) CS + debilitative imagery, (c) MG-M + facilitative imagery, (d) MG-M + debilitative imagery, (e) CS imagery only, (f) MG-M imagery only, (g) no imagery (stretching) control group. A 3 (imagery direction) X 3 (imagery function) X 2 (gender) ANCOVA with pretest scores used as the covariate was used. Results showed a main effect for performance; means were higher for the facilitative group compared to the debilitative group. For self-efficacy, there was a significant imagery direction by imagery function by gender interaction. These findings suggest imagery direction and imagery function can affect self-efficacy and performance and that males and females respond differently to imagery interventions.

The authors are with the Motor Behavior Laboratory at the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND.

Please address all correspondence concerning this manuscript to Sandra E. Short, Faculty of Physical Education and Exercise Science, University of North Dakota, Box 8235, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58202. Email: <Sandra_moritz@und.nodak.edu>.