Self-Evaluation of Competence by Adult Athletes: Its Relation to Skill Level and Personal Importance

in The Sport Psychologist
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $68.00

1 year subscription

USD $90.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $129.00

2 year subscription

USD $168.00

One’s perceived competence relates to participation and effort and can vary depending on the self-evaluation sources that athletes value. Ruble and Frey (1991) theorized that phase of skill development may affect one’s preference for different sorts of competence information. The present study tested Ruble and Frey’s model using a sample of 466 adult tennis players. Skill level was athletes’ United States Tennis Association rating. Participants rated the personal importance of tennis and the importance of different sources of self-assessment information. Results showed that beginners were more likely to value temporal comparisons, and advanced players were more likely to value social comparisons. Players rating tennis as highly important were more likely to value temporal comparisons and effort for self-assessment. The findings support Ruble and Frey’s model.

The author is with the Department of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. E-mail: jsheldon@umd.umich.edu.

The Sport Psychologist
Article Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 9 9 2
Full Text Views 0 0 0
PDF Downloads 1 1 1
Altmetric Badge
PubMed
Google Scholar