Guidelines for Delivering Personal-Disclosure Mutual-Sharing Team Building Interventions

in The Sport Psychologist
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The overall purpose of this study was to provide professional guidance to practitioners who may wish to deliver Personal-Disclosure Mutual-Sharing (PDMS) team building activities. First we replicated and evaluated a PDMS intervention previously used by Dunn and Holt (2004). Fifteen members (M age = 25.4 yrs) of a high performance women’s soccer team provided evaluative data about the intervention they received via reflective interviews. Benefits of the PDMS activity were enhanced understanding, increased cohesion, and improved confidence. Guidelines for professionals who may wish to use this team building approach are provided in terms of (a) establishing group communication practices during the season, (b) delivering the meeting, and (c) demonstrating contextual sensitivity.

The authors are with the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2H9 CANADA. E-mails: nick.holt@ualberta.ca; john.dunn@ualberta.ca.

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