Structured Self-Reflection as a Tool to Enhance Perceived Performance and Maintain Effort in Adult Recreational Salsa Dancers

in The Sport Psychologist
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $68.00

1 year subscription

USD $90.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $129.00

2 year subscription

USD $168.00

The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of structured self-reflection in community dance classes would influence achievement goal orientations, levels of intrinsic motivation, or perceived dance performance. The Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ) and the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI) were modified slightly to reflect involvement in salsa dancing rather than sport and then were administered to 139 Latin dance students at the beginning and end of an 11-week term. The dance classes were divided into control and intervention groups, balanced in terms of sample size and level of instruction. The intervention group completed a salsa self-reflection form during or after class for 9 weeks. At the posttest all students rated their salsa performance and the intervention group evaluated the self-reflection process. Results indicate that although achievement goal orientations were not affected, structured self-reflection is perceived to be a positive tool and may be a useful technique to enhance perceived performance and maintain effort and perceived importance. The participants’ perceptions of the self-reflection process were positive, with no negative effects of engaging in the process reported.

Hanrahan is with the Schools of Movement Studies and Psychology, University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia. Pedro is with the Creative Industries Faculty—Dance, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia. Cerin is with the Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030.

The Sport Psychologist
Article Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 9 9 4
Full Text Views 0 0 0
PDF Downloads 0 0 0
Altmetric Badge
PubMed
Google Scholar