Social Support and Performance in a Golf-Putting Experiment

in The Sport Psychologist

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Tim ReesUniversity of Exeter

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Paul FreemanUniversity of Exeter

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This study examined the impact of a social support manipulation on performance. Participants with high and low levels of perceived support were randomly assigned to an experimental support or control condition, before completing a golf-putting task. Participants with high levels of perceived support performed at a higher level than those with low levels of perceived support. Participants in the support condition performed at a higher level than those in the control condition. A significant interaction was primarily attributable to the low perceived support participants in the support condition performing better than the low perceived support participants in the control condition. Participants in the support condition also experienced less frequent and distracting task-irrelevant thoughts compared with those in the control condition. These results suggest that experimentally manipulated support may lead to improvements in the performance of novices completing a golf-putting task, and that such support may be particularly important for those low in perceived support.

Rees and Freeman are with the School of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK.

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