Moderated and Mediated Effects of Coach Autonomy Support, Coach Involvement, and Psychological Need Satisfaction on Motivation in Youth Soccer

in The Sport Psychologist

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Amanda J. ReynoldsPurdue University

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Meghan H. McDonoughPurdue University

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We examined whether coach involvement moderated the predictive effect of coach autonomy support on motivation both directly and indirectly via need satisfaction. 142 soccer players (106 female; 12-15 years) completed measures of coach autonomy support and involvement, need satisfaction, and motivation. For intrinsic motivation and identified regulation, need satisfaction mediated the effect of autonomy support, but there was also a moderated direct effect whereby autonomy support had a positive effect only when involvement was moderate to high. Autonomy support also positively predicted external regulation and negatively predicted amotivation via need satisfaction. Coach-athlete relationships that are both autonomy supportive and involved are associated with more adaptive forms of motivation, and findings suggest that lack of autonomy support may undermine need satisfaction and motivation.

The authors are with the Dept. of Health and Kinesiology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

Address author correspondence to Meghan H. McDonough at mcdonough@purdue.edu.
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