Psychological Implications of Competitive Running in Elite Young Distance Runners: A Longitudinal Analysis

in The Sport Psychologist
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  • 1 Michigan State University
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Eighteen elite young distance runners were followed over a 5-year period and examined on their perceptions of parental involvement, commitment, anxiety, and sources of worry as these variables pertained to their competitive running. Results showed that the runners received good parental support and possessed a relatively high level of commitment to running, but that both parental involvement and commitment declined over the 5 years. Fathers were seen as being more involved in their children’s running than mothers were. Also, females were somewhat more committed to running than males were. Males and females exhibited similar anxiety scores and these scores did not increase significantly over time. There was no evidence that these runners suffered excessive anxiety.

The authors are with the Department of Physical Education and Exercise Science, Rm. 138 IM Sports Circle, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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